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'A spectacular scenic desert. Gorgeous, colorful, with impressive mountain ranges! Photos don't do justice!'

You might be wondering: What's the best time to experience Wadi Rum desert? Get ready for our fascinating insights and let us help you finding your best time to visit this amazing scenic desert landscape as well as a complete Wadi Rum guide (updated 2019!).  Here is everyhting you need to know (click the links to jump directly to your desired section):

  1. Season Guide:
    Spring
    Summer
    Autumn
    Winter
  2. Where to Stay (The Best Camps)
  3. Quick Facts
  4. Quick Guide (Itinerary)
  5. History and Facts
  6. How to Get to Wadi Rum
  7. What to Do (Activities)
  8. How to Spend the Night
  9. Must-Know Tips


Quick Tip (Organized Tours from Amman): If you're coming from Amman or staying in Amman and want to experience Wadi Rum, as well as Petra,  Dead Sea and maybe Aqaba within a short time frame and hassle-free without taking care of everything, book an organized tour! However, please don't book any tour. We picked 2 tours from our own experience with the best guides. You'll be safe and have an amazing experience. Also important: Within both tours you'l spend one night in Bedouin camp in Wadi Rum. We'd never recommend going there without spending at least one night (read our tips in the main section below).

3 Day Tour: Petra - Wadi Rum - Aqaba -  Dead Sea | Includes pick-up at your hotel in Amman and excellent guides. You spend the night in Wadi Rum (highly recommended). Perfectly organized tour!

2 Day Tour: Petra - Wadi Rum - Dead Sea | A private 2 day tour including pick-up in Amman and spending one night in Wadi Rum. Quote from a visitor: 'An excellent organized trip, perfectly safe and comfortable'

 

 

March - April - May (Spring)

  • Season: Peak season
  • Tourists: Medium - high
  • Weather: Excellent

In March the temperatures are getting pleasant. Often ranging from 15-20°C (59-68°F). From mid-March to late March it's getting even warmer. However, keep in mind that especially in early March the nights are still cold. Definitely bring additional layer of clothes and a jacket. Later in the month nights are getting warmer and you usually don't extra clothing any more during nighttime. In April and May the average daytime temperatures are climbing and reach around 30°C (86°F).

Are there a lot of tourist crowds? Besides autumn, spring is the most popular time to visit Wadi Rum. It's also the busiest time. However, since you are on a tour in a vast desert during the day, tourist crowds are not a big issue. Except for Wadi Rum Village, which is busier of course as well as hot spots visited during desert tours. Book your accommodation well in advance. Another great thing about spring are the desert flowers which bloom in March/April. It's not unlikely that you'll see gorgeous carpets of purple wildflowers during that time.

 

 

June - July - August (Summer)

  • Season: Low season
  • Tourists: Low
  • Weather: Hot - very hot

While in summer the average highs hover around 33°C (91°F) 'only', temperatures can in fact reach 40°C (104°F) and more sometimes. That means it boiling hot at times, especially in July and August. However, you can get lucky as there are days when it's not that hot, even in the summer. On the other hand you could experience heatwaves with extreme temperatures. Even in June there are already days when it gets very hot up to 40°C. For many visitors that's not the time for a pleasant visit. This is why this is low season in Wadi Rum, with the big advantage of having less crowds in Wadi Rum Village and quiet camps.

So, is summer a good time to visit? It depends! First of all, the heat is easier to tolerate than in other regions. Mostly, because it's a dry heat. However, if you're not good with boiling temperatures, don't go in summer. We think it's a great time. Tours in summer take the heat into account: Lunch breaks are longer and in a shady place. If you travel with kids, we'd say choose spring or fall instead. For children it's more difficult to tolerate the heat.

 

 

September - October - November (Autumn)

  • Season: Peak season
  • Tourists: Medium - high
  • Weather: Excellent

In September temperatures are still high up to 35°C (95°F). Especially until mid-September some visitors say it's still too hot for them. Towards the end of September it starts to get cooler. Weather wise from mid-September until end of October it's the most pleasant time to visit. Temperatures range from 20 to 30 °C. Although, evenings, mornings and in particular the nights in October are getting a lot cooler with temps ranging from 8 - 12°C (46 - 54°F) Also, there can be a little rain in October.

Is autumn really that great? In general a fall visit is an excellent time with a lot of daylight (8 - 11 hours of sunshine), beautiful clear skies, less dusty wind and fascinating migrating birds. Another big advantage: You can experience sunrise without getting up in the night. Sunrise is between 6 and 6:30 in autumn. From mid-October through November it's also the perfect time for trekking/hiking tours. While you need warm clothes in the evening and morning already in October, it's even cooler in November (about 10°C / 50°F mornings/evenings) but still not as cold as in winter. In general autumn is a busier time tourist wise. That means places like Wadi Rum Village and some popular tour spots can't be enjoyed in solitude.

 

 

December - January - February (Winter)

  • Season: Low season
  • Tourists: Low
  • Weather: Cooler but not cold (except during nighttime)

Like summer, winter is low season in Wadi Rum. Which results in quieter hot spots and less busy popular sunset places, which you now can enjoy almost in solitude. Is it cold? Not during the day. It's just cooler with average temps between 10-15°C (50-59°F), which is excellent for tours, in particular hiking/trekking tours. But still, prepare for cold evenings and mornings as well as much colder nights. Alle three months, from December to February, are equally 'cold', with January being slightly cooler. Bring layers of clothes, gloves and a warm jacket (rainproof) for the evenings and nights. Warm blankets are provided by the camp. In the night temps can drop to zero degrees celsius.

Can it rain in winter? Yes, Wadi Rum experiences about 15 days of rain every year and most of them in the winter. However, rain showers are usually not very long. Rainfall which is going on for days is very rare and it's very unlikely hat rain will spoil your visit during winter season. Despite popular opinions, we highly recommend a visit to Wadi Rum in the winter.

Weather

It can get very hot in the summer months. However, the heat in Wadi Rum area is more tolerable since it's a dry heat. Unlike in Aqaba for example, where it's getting uncomfortable humid and even hotter. In Petra on the other hand it's slightly cooler due to the higher elevation. From late April throughout May, you may experience 'khamsin' in Wadi Rum. This means hot, dry and dusty winds which may cause heavier sandstorms. Wind, although not as as extreme as 'khamsin', can be present in summer, especially in the afternoon. Good to know for photography are the sunrise and sunset hours: Sunrise and Sunset Times

Avoiding Tourist Crowds

Wadi Rum is still (2018) significantly less busy than Petra for example. However, during spring and fall it gets busy at Wadi Rum Village, as well as at the popular desert hot spot sites. Booking a remote camp (see below) with knowledgeable local guides helps. They can take you to stunning hidden spots, away from all tourists.  Also visiting in the low seasons of winter or summer means enjoying even the popular spots in solitude.

 

A Great Place
JO Jordan
4.875

If you are a fan of the Indiana Jones movies, you have to visit PETRA at least once. It was one of the locations for 'The Last Crusade'. The hidden city where the Bedouins used to live.

No trip to Jordan is complete without a stop at Petra, the stunning and mysterious rose-tinted lost city that stands as the country’s most famous sight.  [This article received a huge update in late 2018! Regarding the video below: Please note that no video or photo does this historic real-life experience justice! On a mobile phone, turn your screen to watch it in landscape mode]:

Many wonder when the best time to visit Petra is, as the weather can definitely influence your experience at the amazing landmark. In truth, the best time to visit Petra is whenever you can make it to Jordan – so if you are restricted as to when you can visit, don’t panic. However, if you do have the flexibility to choose which season you will visit in, it is worth carefully deciding as each season brings a slightly different experience. Tip: Check out our Ultimate Wadi Rum Guide as well!

Continue with the season guide below or jump directly to our Petra Top Tips below as well as a complete guide including every sight.

 

March – April – May (Spring)


Petra (Jordan) in the spring

The springtime is one of the best times to visit Petra, as the temperatures are milder yet still pleasantly warm, and there is not much rain. In March, temperatures are still relatively cool, hovering between about 18°C (64°F) during the day and getting down to about 6°C (49°F) overnight – so be sure to bring some warmer clothes for the evenings and frosty mornings. You can also expect there to be a little bit of rain lingering in March (however it is unlikely to disrupt your holiday), although by April the amount of rain is much less, and the average temperature climbs to a high of about 24°C (75°F), dropping to about 10°C (50°F) overnight. Temperatures continue to climb during May, with a warm average daytime temperature of 28°C (82°F) and overnight lows of about 12°C (53°F). As summer draws near, rainfall is even less during May and it is very unusual for your plans to be interrupted by rain. The skies tend to be a beautiful blue, and there are wildflowers dotted around the landscape, which are great for photographs and views.

Is it crowded?
These pleasant temperatures make the spring months some of the best times to visit Petra, however you will not be alone in thinking so, and April and May in particular attract quite large crowds. If you are planning to visit Petra in spring, be prepared to book tours, transport and accommodation well ahead of time to avoid any disappointments. You can also expect prices to be fairly high due to the peak demand.

What to wear?
Although the temperatures are quite moderate, it is still advisable to pack clothing for extremes, including long, billowy clothing to protect from the sun, as well as some warmer jackets for the cooler nights. The milder temperatures of spring also mean that it is fine to visit the site at any time during the day, although if visiting early in the morning it is still worth bringing a warm extra layer or two, especially in March.

 

June – July – August (Summer)


Petra (Jordan) in the summer

Jordan's summer months are notoriously hot, meaning the crowds thin as people try to avoid the 40°C plus (100°F+) temperatures. Throughout the three months, there is less variation and June, July and August experience very similar temperatures and almost no rainfall. In these months, average daytime temperatures hover around 33°C (91°F) and overnight the mercury usually only dips to around 18°C (64°F). It is not unusual for temperatures to soar above these averages, however, with temperatures around Petra sometimes reaching 42°C (107°F) or more. It is usual for the site to be bathed in sun more than 14 hours per day in summer.

How to protect yourself from the heat?
This temperature can be biting, and it is advisable to take care if visiting Petra in the summer. It is important to wear light, loose-fitting clothing that provides a protective layer from the fierce sun, and bring lots of water. Petra is a large site, and in such warm temperatures you can expect to drink a lot more water than you usually would back home. It is also strongly advisable to try to get to Petra as early as possible when the temperatures are lower, and the crowds are fewer.

Is it quiet tourist wise?
Generally, the summer months at Petra are far less crowded, so as long as you are prepared for the heat, it can be a great time to visit and have more room to explore. However, if you are visiting with older people or children, or are particularly susceptible to heat, you may want to skip this time.

 

September – October – November (Autumn/Fall)


Petra (Jordan) in Autumn

September brings much-needed relief from the scorching temperatures, with the mercury starting to drop and average highs of approximately 31°C (88°F) and overnight lows of about 16°C (61°F). Rainfall is very limited, so the chances of your plans being affected by rain are very low. Overall, September is still quite warm, however, so many visitors stay away until October, when there is a significant drop to approximately 27°C (81°F) during the day, with cooler nights that hover around 11°C (52°F). October is definitely time to put those jackets back in your bag for the chilly evenings, and perhaps a rain jacket as rain is a little more common! By November, overall temperatures can be quite fresh, with an average maximum of 20°C (68°F) during the day and a cool 7°C overnight (44°F). Warmer layers are definitely required if visiting Petra in November, and it is not unusual for there to be some rain during this time.

Is autumn the best time?
October in particular is a popular month for visitors, so you can again expect full occupancy for hotels and tours, so do book ahead. Overall, autumn or fall are a great time to visit Petra as the temperatures are typically mild. These mild temperatures mean visiting at any time of the day is pleasant, although it is advisable to bring warm clothing if arriving early in the morning as it can still be frosty.

 

December – January – February (Winter)


Petra (Jordan) in the winter

Most people do not think of Petra as a winter destination, however there are good reasons to visit Petra in the winter months. In December, temperatures are cool, with an average daytime maximum of around 15°C (59°F) and overnight lows hitting a chilly 5°C (41°F). The rain also starts to pick up, and increases towards the end of the month and into January. January can experience quite extreme lows, with an average daytime maximum of 13°C (55°F) and frosty nights that are just a few degrees above zero. Both January and February can experience some rainy days, and it can even snow at the lost city of Petra. While not very likely, it's even possible, that Petra is closed for 1-3 days due to rain or snow. By February, temperatures are beginning to thaw out a little with an average high of 15°C (59°F), although the nights are still frosty with an average low of 4°C (39°F). In the winter months, there is still an average of about 7 hours of sunshine per day, although Petra is very occasionally closed due to rain. Therefore, it is advisable to leave several days in your itinerary to visit, just in case weather conditions are prohibitive.

Should I really visit in winter?
Although winter is not the most popular time to visit, there are many reasons why visiting Petra in winter can be a great decision. The site certainly has a unique beauty when it snows, and as long as you dress appropriately for the chilly temperatures, there is no reason the frosty lows should put you off entirely. Plus, it is a lower season in terms of tourist numbers – one of the benefits of this means that you can visit later in the day (therefore avoiding the cooler mornings) and it is still not too crowded. In addition, winter offers a softer light which is better for picking up the intricate detail of the rock that Petra is carved from.

 

Weather

Weather in Petra is influenced by its location in the desert, meaning that temperatures can experience quite extreme swings from chilly winters to searing heat in the summer. Even in the warm summer months, overnight temperatures can still be quite cool and mornings can be chilly. Other features of the desert landscape mean that rain is relatively rare (even in the winter) although not non-existent, and there can be sandstorms, especially in autumn and spring. It also has a high UV index so precautions should be taken to protect from sunburn, even if it doesn't feel overly hot. Overall, the weather in Petra is similar to nearby Amman, and is considered a desert or steppe climate.

 

Petra by Night - Is It Worth It?

For a different perspective on Petra, you may like to visit Petra at Night. What is it? Petra Night runs every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8:30 PM. Over 1500 candles are lit. It starts at Petra Visitor Centre. The view can be stunning and romantic, however the decision on whether to visit Petra at night is largely personal. During the peak months such as April and October, it can be very crowded which makes visibility difficult. Although many photographers dream of snapping the beautiful, atmospheric shots of the Treasury illuminated by candlelight, it can be very difficult to actually get this photo due to the crowds. It is largely a matter of luck whether you will be near the front, or toward the back, although arriving early or waiting until the crowds leave after the show can help.

On the other hand, the low season provides better photographic opportunities but in winter it can be bitingly cold and unenjoyable if you are not properly dressed. However, if you are able to layer up, one of the benefits of visiting during the lower season is that you are far more likely to have an unobstructed view of the candles which leads to much better photographs. By contrast, summer is also less crowded and the overnight temperatures are actually very pleasant.

In the end, it is a personal decision whether Petra at night is worth the relatively steep cost, however if (like most people) it is the photographic opportunities that draw you to it, then visiting Petra at night in low season may be a great option. During the peak season, however, it may be preferable to skip it altogether unless you are not worried about the cost and happy to 'roll the dice' with your view.

 

Avoiding the Crowds and Heat (Time of Day)

Petra is undoubtedly Jordan's most popular tourist destination and you should be prepared for crowds. Even in the lowest season, it is unlikely to be completely deserted and during spring and autumn you might find yourself jostling for room! Luckily, there are a few ways to avoid the crowds at Petra.

Go early!
The key way to avoid the crowds is to arrive early, as close to the 6am opening as possible. Most of the tour buses do not arrive as the gates open, so the first hour or two of the day is the best time to explore. Helpfully, this is also generally when the temperatures are at their mildest – so all in all, it is definitely advisable to try to arrive as early as possible. The only time that this is not necessarily the case is during winter, when you may prefer to wait until things warm up a little bit more.

Be aware that even in the warmer months, temperatures do vary and early mornings can still be quite chilly. Even if visiting in a summer month such as June, it is worth bringing a jacket just in case.

Go to different spots!
Another way to avoid the crowds is to try to take in unique viewpoints of Petra. Of course, standing in front of the Treasury is always likely to be crowded, however the site is absolutely huge, and there are many hidden gems where you can get an unobstructed view. For example, you can climb up and look down at the Treasury by following the Al-Khubtha trail. Another beautiful view is from beyond the High Sacrifice. If you go with a guide, they will likely be able to show you some out-of-the-way places where you can get goosebump-inducing views.

 

Photographing Petra (Time of Day)


Petra Jordan
by Sam Amil, CC-BY

The charming and unique lost city of Petra is a photographer's delight, offering many different views and landmarks to photograph. Plus, as the most well-known landmark in Jordan, photographs of Petra are the quintessential souvenir of your stay in the beautiful country. Here are some tips on how to photograph Petra so as to get brilliant photos that will be a reminder of your memories at the rose city.

Arrive early!
Not only does it help with the crowds and the heat, but it also makes all the difference with your photographs. There are fewer people to crowd your photos and get in your shot, but the light is also better before the sun has risen too high, particularly in the Siq (the leadup to Petra). By early- to mid-morning and past noon, the crowds make it difficult to get the classic shots of Petra from the Siq. Likewise, the harsh midday sun tends to wash out Petra. If you miss the early start at Petra, your best bet is to return later, as the afternoon near sunset is another great time to photograph Petra.

Make use of different spots and angles!
As already mentioned, try hiking the different trails to get to different vantage points and away from the crowds. Not only does this reduce the change of other visitors ruining your shot, but it gives you a lot of unique and interesting perspectives on Petra. Finally, if you are serious about photography, you may want to purchase a multiple day pass which will give you the chance to thoroughly explore the site and take plenty of photographs from different angles. In addition, you can document the subtle changes that occur daily at this incredible site.

 

Historic Site
JO Jordan